Game of the Week Blog Reflection Week 11- T.I.M.E. Stories Week 1

In class we played the game T.I.M.E.. Some people played the game two weeks in a row, but I chose to only play it the first week. For me the hardest part was understanding the rules. I was very confused by the rules to the point that I couldn’t even focus on the mystery aspect. I love solving mysteries, however while playing this game I was too focused on the rules to pay attention to all of the clues. 

We tied this game to leadership with our discussion about does leadership ever end and can you win at leadership. I think my friend Spencer would like to play this game because he likes role playing games and thinking strategically. 

Everyone I played with chose not to save for week 2 of this game, mainly because we were all confused. We all did start to get into it when we started moving rooms. The one thing I did like about this game was moving to different locations and being able to unlock new maps. However, I did not like how confusing the rules were and how the rules took away from me being able to solve the mystery.   

Game of the Week Blog Reflection (For Class on 4/21/2022): T.I.M.E Stories Part 2

During our last meeting, my group from the prior week got together to finish our game of T.I.M.E. Stories. T.I.M.E. Stories is a cooperative card-based game that requires the players to travel throughout time to uncover and prevent faults in time itself. Your team works together by possessing the bodies of people present at the time and location in question and using their abilities to investigate the area and find the source of the fault. To do this, your team will have to spend Temporal Units, a resource that determines how long your team can remain in that time. Once it runs out, you will be forced to start over, only keeping certain cards and the knowledge you gained during your first “loop”. For this session, our team started on our second of these loops, and used the knowledge we gained from our previous loop to try and locate the source of the fault.

Over the course of this second session, I would say that the most difficult thing that we ran into would be the final puzzle we had to solve before we could enter the last area of the game. Without spoiling the puzzle itself, the main difficulty of this puzzle came from the multiple layers that were involved in it. Our group had to gain knowledge from several, seemingly unrelated clues spread throughout the entirety of the scenario, before finally reaching a specific location. Once at that location, our group had to use all of these clues to finally piece together the solution to the puzzle so that we could advance and complete the story. While this puzzle was certainly difficult, it was very satisfying to piece it all together, and was only possible because our group was working together and combining our knowledge of everything we had seen up until that point. 

However, what could this particular puzzle teach us about leadership? For one thing, our group was only able to finally reach the solution to the puzzle by combining all of our viewpoints and our ideas of what the various pieces of the puzzle could be referring to. Not one of us knew the entire solution, even with all of the clues, and we needed to combine our knowledge and logic to reach the solution. Similarly, a leader could not possibly succeed on their own, they need to work together with their team in order to reach  their goal. Every member’s viewpoint and skills are just as important to the team as any others, a fact that a good leader must always remember if they want to lead their team to success.

Overall, I definitely enjoyed my time with T.I.M.E. Stories. I was a bit uncertain of just how much I would enjoy it after running into issues with the rules during the prior week, but now that our team was more certain of what we were doing, it was a lot of fun! Piecing together that last puzzle was certainly the greatest highlight of our time with the game, and the journey to finally reach that solution featured a lot of interesting scenarios and discoveries that kept us glued to the game. I would definitely be interested in trying out the second story in the T.I.M.E. Stories series just to see if it has any puzzles similar to this one, along with whatever scenarios it might involve.

Written Game Review- Pathfinder Wrath of the Righteous

During this semester one of my favorite video games I’ve played is Pathfinder: Wrath of the Righteous. Wrath of the Righteous released last year and is the second RPG from Owlcat Games based on a Pathfinder adventure path campaign. I found the story and character of Wrath of the Righteous more interesting, so I played it before Kingmaker. In the story the protagonist develops otherworldly powers and becomes the leader of the crusade to fight back against an army of demons.


The amount of content in the game is massive. I have 150 hours in the game according to Steam and I’m at most 75% through my first playthrough. My time is bloated though from the fact I only play on turn-based mode in combat instead of real-time. The main replayability of the game comes from its mythic path system. Early in the game you pick which of 6 different sources your powers are from. I picked Azata which are like good-aligned fey. There are some special paths you can unlock later in the game, but they have much less unique content from what I’ve heard. My favorite aspect of the game so far is the characters and story. Several of the party members are unique and interesting. Even a few of the NPCs not in my party are very intriguing. The representation in game is very good, especially LGBT representation. The story is a war of epic proportions facing off against powerful demon lords. Picking Azata allows me to roleplay as a hero that doesn’t stick to closely to the rules. The worst Azata content is a bit too silly and weird, but having a pet dragon who participates in scenes like my other party members is more than worth it.


The problems with the game come down to its difficulty and lack of information about its systems. I have been playing on normal, the third of seven difficulties, and have found many fights in the game unfairly hard. Also, as someone very familiar with 5e D&D rules but not Pathfinder learning to rules of the system only by playing this game is extremely difficult. If you don’t have a ton of spare time to plan builds you should let the game decide what to learn on level up. A lot of mechanics such as status conditions are only explained by pop-up windows that show up when you are under its effect. The crusade mode has entirely different mechanics and you could screw yourself and waste a lot of time if you lose battles. Too much of this mode isn’t explained in enough detail and your game difficulty doesn’t affect crusade mode at all. The developers did add an auto crusade mode if you prefer to not play it at all at least.


Leadership is a huge aspect of the story once you take charge of the crusade. A significant amount of time must be devoted to building up your forces to fight demon armies in battle. Crusade management also has meetings with your advisors to make decrees. Each of the advisors suggest a different solution to the current problem and you decide which path to take. There are no right or wrong decisions, each choice has its own benefit. Even outside of the crusade you are managing an adventuring party. All the different party members have different classes and abilities to fulfill different roles. Having group members with the right skill sets is important for success both in game and in real life leadership teams.

Game of the Week Blog Reflection 10- Ladies & Gentlemen

One week in class we played Ladies & Gentlemen. I was a gentleman and had a lot of fun doing the fast-paced stock market. The hardest part of the game for me was waiting on the women side. On my side of the table, we always got through our parts really fast and then waited forever for the women side. I enjoyed all of the jokes the gentlemen were making in the role play, however it got really boring waiting on the women to make decisions. I assume though that that is just how the game goes. 

I think some of my friends would like to play this game who like strategic play, but also a faced paced other side of the table. I have friends who I know would like the ladies side and I have friends who I know would like the gentlemen side. In particular I think my friend Joe would really get into the role play and enjoy this game. 

Our session went well; however, we were unable to finish the whole game. I liked the stock market aspect. However, it was rather boring at times waiting on the ladies. I wish the tasks per side were more equal in timing. The gentlemen always got our part done and then had to wait around for the ladies. 

In terms of leadership, we discussed making everyone feel comfortable to be included. We discussed how in our roleplay many of us assumed we had social identities of people who are in the majority. Very few if anyone assumed their character had a disability or other social identity that would put them in the minority in the setting. 

Game of the Week Blog Reflection 10: Ladies & Gentlemen

I think gender stereotypes are well represented in games. The game we played together this week, Ladies & Gentlemen, is sure to upend the perception of women who have played the game. In fact, with the exception of board games, women are consistently undervalued in video games, both in terms of interest in games and the skill of playing them. In classes other than 290, I once discussed with my peers in an education class about gender in STEM literacy education. We mentioned that very few women receive games as gifts and even many women never receive games as gifts. There are even differences in the types of games, such as cooking games, dressing up Barbie is the type of games that girls should play. The gunfight, the King of Fighters is a game suitable for boys. That’s why Ladies & Gentlemen amazes me so much. The game exploits once stereotypes about the gender of men and women. In the game, gentlemen need to get up early every day and work hard to find resources and make money. Ladies should choose clothes that suit them and highlight their economic status, and compare their accessories with other ladies.

This game brought me a lot of laughs. Because there are only two women in our group plus me, and both of us are playing “gentlemen” in the game. This means that there are three men who need to “put on a lady’s skirt”. When watching them show off to each other whose husband bought the most things; comparing who is the most beautiful woman, the contrast is really funny. And this game both requires business strategy and shopping dress up. So both boys and girls can find fun in this game. During the game, some boys said that they finally realized the fun of shopping. For me, I can also realize the status of men at home. Not only did it make me think that women may not be the only victims when we talk about gender stereotypes. People take it for granted when the “husband” is working hard as a man. Especially after the game was over, our professor mentioned that the game was designed by women, and I became more admirable for this game. The game addresses issues of social justice in a joyful way and allows people of different genders to actually experience life in each other’s shoes. I think this game has deep meaning in addition to bringing joy to everyone, and I will definitely bring this game to more friends around me.

Game of the Week Blog Reflection 7: Two Rooms and A Boom!

Two Room and a Boom is my favorite game so far in the course. There are so many elements in it that make me change my view of the game as just relaxing or wasting time. This game made me feel the importance of leadership, strategy development, team communication and not compromising physical health.

First of all, there are many different roles, but each team has a leader, and this role of the leader can be passed on to the next player. I think this has a very important impact on leadership development. As we were playing the game I observed that since leadership roles are transferable, this gives many members the opportunity to experience leadership. And because the setting of this game requires constant exchange of players in two “rooms”, I think everyone does not need to worry about the physical harm caused by sitting for a long time while focusing on playing the game. This is a very shocking point for me when the game is in progress because almost all the games I have participated in are played while sitting in a fixed position. Secondly, I really like one of the gray character cards, called “The Gambler”, because it fits my personality very much, and I really like watching the progress of both sides and guessing where things are going. This is also a very shocking point for me that this game can have so many different characters, which can satisfy the fun of playing this game for people with different personalities.

This is a very exciting game that gave me an unforgettable gaming experience. The only downside is that this game has a minimum range of 6 people. Due to the diversity of its characters, I guess the game will be more interesting with more people, but in everyday life, it is difficult to get together such a large number of people to play with I think.

Game of the Week Blog Reflection (For Class on 4/14/2022): T.I.M.E Stories

In our most recent meeting, our class met to start playing T.I.M.E. Stories, a cooperative, card-based game that sees a team of player’s traveling to a specific point in time to uncover and prevent a fault in time itself. You and your teammates will be placed into the bodies of people present at that time and location, each of which will have their own specialties and limitations that affect how the team performs. Bear in mind though that every action you take to investigate the area, interacting with cards, traveling to new locations, completing tests and participating in combat, will require you to spend Temporal Units, a shared resource that determines how long you can remain in this time. The base cards at the start of the game will inform you just how many cards Temporal Units your team begins with, and reaching zero Temporal Units will force you to flip over a failure card before resetting the game and starting over. However not all items will be reset if this happens, and your own knowledge of the events can be kept. 

However, the most difficult part of playing this game for our team was not any of these mechanics specifically, but rather the rules of the game itself. T.I.M.E. Stories is a very complex board game, with a lot of various moving parts that make it quite intimidating for first-time players such as ourselves, and the rule itself does not do a good job of explaining things. There were multiple times while we were playing where we were uncertain of how something functioned, or of how a particular mechanic worked. The rule was unfortunately not very helpful on this mark, it feels poorly organized, and some things that you would expect to be explained in the rulebook are actually only explained on cards, meaning that you won’t actually be able to fully understand how the game plays until you start playing it yourself.

With this in mind though, what does T.I.M.E. Stories have to do with leadership? Personally, I believe that one of T.I.M.E Stories best contributions to leadership is its emphasis on teamwork. Given that Temporal Units are in such short supply, the players are heavily encouraged to strategize before deciding anything, determining which team members should interact with which cards. Sharing information is also critical if the players hope to advance through the game, as clues acquired at one location are possibly required to complete tasks later on. Similarly, if a leader hopes to accomplish any of their team’s goals, they need to ensure that their team members are working together and cooperating effectively. If a team does not work well together, progress on whatever project or goal they may be working towards will slow to halt, so a leader must ensure that their team members compliment each other.

Overall, I do think I had fun with T.I.M.E. Stories, though the issues that we ran into with the rules certainly did make it more stressful than I expected it to be at times. Now that our team has a better understanding of the rules and how they fit together, I would like to see if we could make more progress next week, as we saved our game at the end of our first “run”. I would also be interested in trying out some of the other Stories that have been created for the game, as one group in particular was actually playing the second Story, and it appeared to function very differently from the Story that our group was playing.

What Type of Gamer Am I?

On the board game quiz, I scored high in conflict and extremely high in social manipulation. If I’m playing a competitive game, I prefer to be able to directly interfere with the other players. Social manipulation games are a ton of fun and there are plenty to pick from. Most of these games have an ‘evil’ team that is outnumbered but has more knowledge than the other team. The fun of this side is tricking the other players into trusting you. The other side usually has less info and must find out who in the group is against them. The game typically helps you deduce who not to trust in the game.


For the next category I had a high strategy score and a decent score in discovery. I usually spend a lot of time planning out my turn in games, if not several turns ahead. It’s always satisfying when a plan finally pays off. For discovery I tend to have a habitat of letting others recommend what games to play. While I do have a list of favorites that I like to reply I’m always interested in learning something new. Also if I know in advance I’ll be playing a new game I try to study the rules in advance to know what to do.


One of my highest scores was immersion, compared to a low aesthetic grade. My interest in a game is heavily determined by how thematic it is. I do like games that are more mechanic focused like Azul but tend to only try them out at the recommendation of others. When a game has a well-built world, I sometimes spend time reading the lore specifically like with Sentinels of the Multiverse. For aesthetics this is largely something I ignore. While nice components in a game are a cool plus I care more about the game being affordable.


Finally, I had a very low social fun score and a considerable score in cooperation. When I’m playing games, I tend to take them seriously and strategize heavily, as indicated by my previous score. I’m not the biggest fan of ‘party games’ which are likely the most popular for this category. A lot of my favorite board games are co-op games against the game. However, the ones I like are heavy on strategy in order to win. The players usually all have different abilities emphasizing the need to work together.

Game of the Week Blog Reflection Week 11: T.I.M.E. Stories Week 1

For the last game in class we started playing T.I.M.E. Stories. Since I have already played through the first scenario my group played the second scenario, the Marcy Case, instead. In this game we are agents working to prevent changes to the timeline. To do so we control the minds of people present at that point in time, who each have their own strengths and weaknesses. Players then explore areas in different locations finding items or fighting enemies until they finish their mission.

The differing skills of the playable characters emphasize the need for teamwork. Similar to leadership teams in real life some people are more proficient at completing certain tasks than others. Having people work together makes that task finish faster, but also means the team can work on less things overall. Some of the rules for T.I.M.E. Stories also are related to leadership. Making a different player time captain each area allows everyone to experience being the leader. This also helps make sure all the players feel included throughout the game.

The main difficulty of the second case so far is how heavy a focus it has on combat. Each player has to manage a lot of tokens that represent things like ammo, on top of the usual item management. There is also a noise management that causes issues if you use guns too often during combat. This means we often resorted to using weaker melee attacks to not cause ourselves more problems later. Not only does this make us more likely to take damage during combat, but also makes it take longer in general. Since we were working under a strict time limit both in-game and in real life our careful strategies probably won’t work as well next week.

Game of the Week Blog Reflection 10: Ladies & Gentlemen

This week we played Ladies & Gentlemen during class, where I played as a lady. My goal was to buy clothing in order to score the most points, however I had to rely on my team member playing as a gentlemen to pay for all the clothes. Since our game only had 3 teams instead of 4 we managed to get through every round and have higher scores. In the end I ended up losing by only 2 points, which easily could have been a tie with just one $100 more to buy one last item. Its also interesting to note that I didn’t pay much attention to how the gentlemen side was played and switching teams would likely feel like I was playing an entirely different game.

The most difficult aspect of the game was the limited communication with your teammate. Without knowing how much money my partner had it was difficult to know which clothing I should be picking out to buy each day. I also had to be careful about what clothing I would hand to him. I couldn’t specifically say which cards were the most important to buy so I had to make assumptions about which he would pick anytime I wanted to hand over more than one card. This made me hesitant to try more complicated strategies, such as picking clothing I knew the other ladies wanted, because I wouldn’t be able to communicate to not actually buy those clothes.

Having to rely on my partner during the game reflects the importance of teamwork in leadership. One person can’t do everything so you have to trust others to help. My teammate’s role was similar to what a treasurer in a club might do, manage how the club spends it’s money. The clothing I was picking out to buy would be like scheduling events for the club in this comparison. Even as a leader all of these responsibilities would be too much for just one person. If these roles are split between different people on a team however their chance of success is much higher.