Game Reflection: Two Rooms & A Boom

The game we played this week is called Two Rooms & A Boom, and as many people mentioned during class, this game is very similar to the Werewolf. The hardest part of this game was to understand and remember what the roles are and what they can do. There was one thing that makes this game even harder: this game was about hiding or lying about the roles. Therefore, it is difficult to ask other players what the roles can do. For example, I forgot what “Hot Potato” can do when we were playing, so I struggled a little and then decided to ask someone what it was.

Many leadership skills were applied in this game, but the most important one was how to communicate with other people to get useful information. Players had to know how to exchange information so that they could receive the most benefits, but at the same time, they needed to keep their secrets as well. For example, the “boom” had to consider whether revealing the role to the other red teammates is a good idea because the blue spy is also on the red team. Since this game is very similar to the Werewolf, I think my friend named Kath would enjoy playing this, as I mentioned in the game reflection for the Werewolf, Kath was on the team for the Debate Competition and she likes to argue with people with logic.

We started the session with some explanations of the rules and the roles. I think it would be helpful to have a list of the roles and what they can do, so we can take a look before class and even during the game. I like to play this game because we can play a couple of rounds with different roles as the time of playing this game is not very long. The part that I dislike about this game is I have to talk to other people individually sometimes to exchange information but I may not know these people. However, I think this is one of the most interesting sessions in this class because we can play different roles in one class period.

Game Reflection: Ladies & Gentlemen

The game we played this week was Ladies & Gentlemen, and according to the title, we know this game usually has two types of roles: ladies and gentlemen. There are different tasks to do depending on the roles, and the rules for each role are different depending on whether you choose to be a lady or a gentleman. This game is separated into three time spots: morning, afternoon, and evening. In the mornings, the ladies decide which stores they want to go to, and the gentlemen need to grab the goods they need from the market. In the afternoons, the ladies start shopping in the store they selected in the morning and decide what they want to buy, and the gentlemen need to either sell their goods or complete contracts for money. When the evenings come, everyone goes home and the ladies show the things they picked, and the gentlemen need to decide whether they want to buy them or if they have enough money to buy them.

As for leadership, some people acted as leaders on both sides and even they may not have noticed that. This game requires both sides to do actions at the same time so it is necessary to communicate during the game. Moreover, the leader can also push other people to move forward as sometimes the ladies may need a long time to decide what things they want to buy, like me in this game. I think my friend named Lily would enjoy this game when playing as a lady because she loves shopping, but she may make the whole process very slow because it can take her forever to decide what she wants.

I think the session went very well, and this is a game that can help people to ice break a little bit because the table is so long, so you have to talk to the people beside you if you need something from the other side of the table. I like being a lady and I feel very chill because all I need to do is shopping. I don’t really like how the gentlemen play because that is a little aggressive for me and I may end up with nothing valuable every day.

Game Reflection: Survive Escape From Atlantis

The game we played this week was Survive Escape From Atlantis, and the hardest part for me was to escape from the monsters, especially the Sea Serpent. The Sea Serpent can destroy the ship and kill everyone on the ship when it is on the same sea space with an occupied ship. The rules for this game were easy to understand, but I was a little confused on how to use the back of the tiles because some of them had to be used immediately, in your own turn, or outside your turn. Everyone in the group also had trouble remembering what all the cards meant, so each one of us had to take a look at the instructions every time when we flipped one tile. 

This game is tied to leadership because it teaches people how to negotiate with other people and how to change your enemies to friends. It is very important for leaders to negotiate with other people, maybe not their enemies, but they probably need to negotiate with people who do not agree with them or don’t want to listen to them. 

I think everyone would enjoy playing this game, especially if they are playing it with someone they know of. I think this game can be very intense or very relaxing depending on the players. For example, when I played it in my group my goal was not to win after three of my people were out of the game on the same ship. Therefore, I was only going after the person who took my three people out of the game for revenge, and I even helped some other players. 

This game is one of my favorite games from this class, and one of the best playing experiences from this class too. I really like how people can play this game in a very fun and chill way even though this game should be a little intense. I also like the idea that the back of the tile is also useful and it has different meanings to the game, but at the same time, these meanings are difficult to remember and to understand when I started to play. 

Campus Gaming Event: Everdell

Tonight I attended the regular campus gaming event and picked the game Everdell to play. During this summer I found myself at a board game bar in Dayton they had this game but I didn’t have the opportunity to play it. Originally the artwork is what interested me in playing the game because I like the forest and the animals remind me of children’s books I used to read a lot growing up. If I had to envision myself in an ideal happy place, it would be a magical forest, hence why the game I designed takes place in a similar setting.
I took a look at the other games available tonight but I just kind of knew that I wanted to play Everdell, even if that meant playing it by myself. I’m not very good at figuring games out on my own so I called Grace from class and told her if she could make it to the gaming event, she should try so I wasn’t stuck figuring it out alone. I assembled the tree and by the time I got the board set out, Issac came over and asked if he could show me how to play the game and play it with me. I didn’t know many people at this event and the people I did recognize seemed very interested in the games that they had picked to play, so I wasn’t eager to recruit anyone. I am glad Issac took the initiative to come help me, and he seemed genuinely excited to play, he said this game is one of his favorites. Eventually, more people expressed interest in playing and we were able to start. Originally one of the first comments that were made was that Everdell is comparable to Wingspan in terms of complexity and I really think that was an accurate statement. I’ve played Wingspan and really enjoyed it, but I think I enjoyed this game more just because of its theme and interactive game pieces.
When playing the game I really enjoyed all the cards, understanding the cards is definitely the most complicated part of the game but I feel like I was able to comprehend them after they were explained. I tried to play high-value cards but ended up without a lot of points at the end of the game and my city only had 10 cards instead of a full 15. Even though we played the game for almost two hours, it seemed like it went by too quickly and that we should have had more time to build our cities, I guess that just means that I was having fun. I felt like I consistently had a lot of cards, and was running out of resources, so maybe I should pick a new strategy next time. At the end of the game, I definitely lost and did not have the first or second highest amount of points, but I know what I need to do next time. In the future, I feel like I would like to understand more about how this game could be played as a single-player game or just with two players, and to what extent that changes the gameplay dynamic. Overall I am so glad that I finally had the opportunity to play this game. I definitely want to play this game again and will likely get it as a Christmas gift.


TIME Stories Week 2 Reflection

I’m genuinely very glad that I had the opportunity to play this game again. The first time, my group was entirely lost and the other group members just did not seem to enjoy the concept of the game in general. I did not realize we were playing this game this week, so I showed up to class unprepared, but the game demonstration helped a lot. I think although my group was very lost the first time we played, having at least a little knowledge of how the game works was reassuring when we were trying to figure it out again. The first time I played TIME Stories, I left with more questions than answers, but I appreciated the artwork and mystery element to the game. This is definitely the most immersive game I’ve played, and because of that, I think it’s a new favorite. Playing this game feels like I’m in a video game or movie, but I like that we have choices and can come back to rooms or decide as a group how we want to go about playing the game.
Week two of this game felt a bit more intense than week one. I think I liked the exploration phase of week one better than the more calculated game play of week two. I was glad that we had some group members that really understood game play and could remember all of the choices we needed to make for the second time around playing the game. For the second week, I definitely took less of a leadership role and more so followed the members who seemed to have a plan in order. To be honest, I don’t know how people would play this game and successfully complete the mission the first time, just because I feel like there’s a maze of steps that need to be done in order to successfully complete the game, and there’s too many dead ends that can cause your team to die or run out of time. I did enjoy how the game ended for the most part, I feel like it made sense to the story, but I also felt like it was slightly uneventful. I don’t know exactly what I was expecting but it felt like it was just suddenly over.
To be honest, I don’t think most of my friends would be able to sit through an entire game of Time Stories due to the time commitment. I think I understand it enough now to where I can explain how to play, and they won’t feel too overwhelmed by the complications, but convincing them to play a 4 hour long game with me is asking a lot. I think in order to convince them, I would have to explain to them how the game works in advance, and give them a few details of the plot to gauge their interest. However, my friend Josh might enjoy the game because he enjoys video games and I feel like this game demonstrates some video game-like qualities. Josh also likes to fully commit to things he’s doing and doesn’t like giving up and also does not like losing, so I feel like he would be more likely to sit through this game than other people because of the challenge. Overall I think I would play another version of TIME Stories. I don’t know if the zombie game that follows the asylum version really sparks my interest, but some of their other plots might.

Carla Hall Lecture Reflection

This lecture series was a treat to attend, and yes the pun was intentional. Carla talked about being unapologetically herself and coming into her true authentic self as she’s gotten older and how her acting career propelled her to come out of her shell. She advised us to take the windy path, and that life’s unexpected events help make us who we are. We don’t need to have everything “figured out,” and that we should aspire to get comfortable being uncomfortable. Say yes, adventure follows, then growth.
Then Carla transitioned into talking about her wardrobe and how she values her wardrobe and allows it to reflect her personality. Carla encouraged us to embrace who we are by the self expression of our clothes. When Carla is wearing clothes that she likes and feels comfortable in, she feels powerful and confident. Throughout her time on tv, there have been times where Carla was told how to dress or do her makeup and hair, and she’s come to realize how valuable self expression can be on your mood and performance. Despite the media’s wishes, Carla Hall has insisted on letting her hair go naturally gray, rather than dying it artificially. This was a decision she had to think about a lot, because it goes against society’s expectation that gray hair should be colored to look more youthful. Now with gray hair, Carla promotes the natural beauty of aging and being your authentic self, gray hairs and all. This was Carla’s way of taking her power back, and not letting others have too much influence over her life. She claimed that she would rather lose a job being who she is vs keep it trying to pretend to be someone else.
Some of the things Carla spoke about really resonated with me. She is also an enneagram 7, which is “the enthusiast.” This was unsurprising, as she gets very enthusiastic about everything and radiates a very positive energy. In her words, her superpower is that she loves people, and I feel like this is the same for me. I also love that Carla is very passionate about being your authentic self because this is something I frame my life around. Lastly, Carla discussed the importance of living in the moment and how when you’re overthinking things too much, you lose authenticity by being too calculated. We draw attention to ourselves when we get too embarrassed, but if we just accept our mistakes and learn to laugh at ourselves and not take things too seriously, we become more magnetic.

What Type of Gamer Am I? Results

The results of this quiz were not especially surprising to me. I generally know what kinds of games and mechanics I like, and the game essentially told me what I already knew. That does at least mean the quiz is accurate though, which is good. My profile was “Low Conflict and Gregarious”.

My highest scores were in the categories of Social Fun and Aesthetics, which scans perfectly for me. I love tabletop games even more than things like online video games because it’s so much easier to have a connection with the people you play in person with, and there’s really no experience quite like having a group you meet up with week after week to play with. Aesthetics I value for a different reason, mostly just because I’m a big graphic design nerd, and I love games that have really strong artwork and visual design. It’s one of the reasons I love card games like Magic and Flesh and Blood so much, they always go above and beyond with their artwork and graphics. Social Manipulation comes in third, which really is just a subsection of Social Fun for me. In my opinion, one of the best ways to create variance in a game is with people: A game where people can make a lot of different decisions makes a game much more fun and replayable, and will always lead to a lot of great stories. There’s a reason social deduction games are so popular, there’s tons of room for personal creativity and narrative equity.

My love of games as social experiences also shines through in other results not shown on the main graph, like the high values in Chance and Accessibility. Accessibility is an easy one: While I do like my games to have some depth, the less time we need to spend learning the rules and reading the rulebook, the better. Ideally we should be able to mostly just jump right in to the fun part with just a bit of explanation. Accessibility also extends to being able to invite in players of all backgrounds or skill levels, everyone should be able to feel welcome playing a game. Chance goes along with what I was mentioning earlier about narrative equity and creating stories: Not only do random elements stop a game from becoming “solved” and keep it replayable, super memorable random outcomes make for great stories. My low score in cooperation is mostly just a personal taste thing: I like plenty of co-op games, but I think they’ve become a bit overdone/overexposed recently. I like my games to have some amount of competition, generally.

Finally, the other big part of my profile was “low conflict.” This should be unsurprising if you’ve been reading my reasoning for my other results: I don’t dislike competition, but having fun with a group is first and foremost why I love tabletop games. Trying to win absolutely has its place, but some people really take it too far, and it can lead to the game not being fun for the rest of everyone else. I like to try and keep things light, still trying to win as much as I can but not letting that be my entire focus of playing, even when playing in tournaments I always like talking to my opponent after the game, because that community aspect is so important to me.

T.I.M.E. Stories Week One: A Reflection

T.I.M.E. Stories is reminiscent of an escape room/choose your own adventure game. It is a collaborative game that practically requires you to take notes. One notable thing about the game is how the artwork contributes to the story. One downside to the game is the difficulty in understanding the game before you play. There is a large learning curve right at the beginning while you are trying to set up and learn how to start. However, once you figure the setup out, it really flows smoothly from there on out.

I think the initial setup and how to start playing was the most difficult part of the game for me. Although, another challenging point was deciding where to travel as a group because we would all have to go to the same room all together. I have enjoyed playing collaborative games like Pandemic, Forbidden Desert, and a variety of escape room games with my family. I believe this makes me really appreciate the collaborative aspects of T.I.M.E. Stories.

My group failed because of running out of time units. After this failure, I decided to play a different role. I had initially been the girl with anxiety which had forced me to always go with a partner to different parts of the rooms we were exploring. When I switched roles, I became the bitter old lady with not a lot of heart but some resilience. I did not have many opportunities to compare the roles, but after the first class time spent playing this game, I think I prefer the girl with anxiety.

I think a lot of the leadership aspects that this game highlights were ones we discussed following the week we played Pandemic or Forbidden Island. This game required collaboration as well as an ability to be accountable as an individual in order to make the collaborative game easier overall.

I am looking forward to playing this game during our second week of designated class time. I also believe that my family would really enjoy playing this game together, so I look forward to introducing them to this game at some point. If you like collaborative games or escape rooms, I would highly recommend trying T.I.M.E. Stories at some point.

Two Rooms and a Boom: A Class Reflection

Two Rooms and a Boom is an engaging and entertaining party game. This game has similarities to Werewolf which we played at the beginning of the semester. It requires a lot more involvement as characters are moving between rooms and have a limited amount of time to complete the objective in an attempt to win the game. Different roles in this game included the President and the Bomber, Red spy and Blue spy, Romeo and Juliet, clown and mime, and many more. I would say my favorite role was a spy or the mime because it allowed me to be really observant of other people’s roles. I think I would have done well in the gambler role because of my observation and logic skills. I think these roles are also some of the more difficult roles in the game.

This game exemplifies a variety of ways someone can be a leader. Even though I never held the leader card, I was able to share insight and perspective that also influenced the game. In this way, I felt like I was truly able to lead by example. I also felt like the more outspoken roles and the quieter roles showed the importance of being able to listen to comrades and be a voice for your group.

The hardest part of the game was when there were roles introduced that would force you to switch roles with another player. This was difficult because it made players even warier in sharing their roles with other players which seemed to be a key component of how the game is played. I never ended up switching roles with another player but I also tried to follow cards as they switched so I knew who had what cards.

Another difficult aspect of the game was being unable to see what was happening in the other room. Although, I think this added more to the game and makes it more interesting overall. This aspect of being in two rooms required you to really think about what you were seeing and try to keep track of cards that were entering the other room during the ‘hostage’ exchanges.

I am going to recommend this game to my older brothers because I know they like the game Werewolf. I may also introduce this game to my many cousins who have really enjoyed playing Werewolf in the past. I think this game will be better for some of these younger cousins because they are able to interact more with other people and they have a higher chance of winning on their own. This game is also good because my cousins won’t get upset as easily as they are in the game the whole time rather than having the possibility of being voted out.

This game has been a very good experience for me. I would like to consider how to make this game even more accessible so more people are able to play. Maybe dividing a single room in such a way that there is less walking required. I also wish this game was still being made, but it is available as a print and play which I look forward to using.

Soaring Through Time in TIME Stories, Week 1

I’m genuinely very glad that I had the opportunity to play this game again. The first time, my group was entirely lost and the other group members just did not seem to enjoy the concept of the game in general. I did not realize we were playing this game this week, so I showed up to class unprepared, but the game demonstration helped a lot. I think although my group was very lost the first time we played, having at least a little knowledge of how the game works was reassuring when we were trying to figure it out again. The first time I played TIME Stories, I left with more questions than answers, but I appreciated the artwork and mystery element to the game. This is definitely the most immersive game I’ve played, and because of that, I think it’s a new favorite. Playing this game feels like I’m in a video game or movie, but I like that we have choices and can come back to rooms or decide as a group how we want to go about playing the game.
I was not the time keeper while playing the game, and to be honest, I still don’t really know how that part is played. It seems like every time we engage in combat, or switch to a new location we have to move the time pieces, but I don’t understand the concept enough to do it on my own without clarification. It also seems a little unclear who receives the object if two people are in the same room at the same time. Does it really matter? It seems like either everyone wins or everyone loses together in this game. I also feel unsure about what the different characters really mean and how our character choice impacts the story. If you have played the game before, is there a strategy to pick certain characters? Or are all the characters pretty much equal and just have slightly different strengths and weaknesses that end up balancing out in the end.
This game taught me that it’s important to not rely on other people to know what is going on because someone has to take on the leadership responsibility/ role and instruct others in that situation. The first time I played this, nobody knew what was going on, so nobody was really able to take on a leadership role. Part of leadership is being prepared and taking initiative. I’m glad we were able to collaborate better the second time around and I think everyone took turns coming up with strategies about what our next move in the game should be.
To be honest, I don’t think most of my friends would be able to sit through an entire game of Time Stories due to the time commitment. I think I understand it enough now to where I can explain how to play, and they won’t feel too overwhelmed by the complications, but convincing them to play a 4 hour long game with me is asking a lot. I think in order to convince them, I would have to explain to them how the game works in advance, and give them a few details of the plot to gauge their interest. However, my friend Josh might enjoy the game because he enjoys video games and I feel like this game demonstrates some video game-like qualities. Josh also likes to fully commit to things he’s doing and doesn’t like giving up and also does not like losing, so I feel like he would be more likely to sit through this game than other people because of the challenge. I am looking forward to finishing the game next week!